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The Nautilus Telegraph's letters pages have some of the keenest insights in the industry. If you have something to say to your fellow maritime professionals, email the editor at telegraph@nautilusint.org. Letters should be 300 words or less, and photos illustrating your point are also welcome. You can ask not to be identified by name, or to be known only by your Nautilus membership number, but you must supply your name and address. The editor reserves the right to crop or edit readers’ letters, and to refuse publication. Letters will be published as space permits, online and in the printed Nautilus Telegraph. 

Latest letters

Letters to the editor

Ships of the past letter - Tokyo Bay 6

I joined the Tokyo Bay in Southampton and left there in 1996. Apart from a day trip to France as a teenager, it was my first major trip abroad.

  • 10 August 2021
Letters to the editor

The Telegraph is a great way in to the maritime community

I didn't realise how hazardous it was for seamen until I began reading the Nautilus Telegraph. Corrupt owners – men unable to return home – loss of wages – accidents.

  • 10 August 2021
Letters to the editor

There's more going on with charts than meets the eye

In your recent item about the Marine Accident Investigation Branch report into the grounding of the mv Kaami, there was no reference made to reports that the Kaami's electronic chart system was not the only electronic chart system being used inappropriately that night.

  • 10 August 2021
Letters to the editor

North Wales MNA is up and running – and in person!

A year on from our appeal for members in the Nautilus Telegraph and other publications, I am pleased to report that the new North Wales branch of the Merchant Navy Association (MNA) held its first in-person meeting on Wednesday 7 July 2021 at the Cae Mor Hotel on the promenade at Llandudno.

  • 12 July 2021
Letters to the editor

Titanic scapegoat is still owed an apology

A recent Channel Four documentary, Titanic: A Dead Reckoning, once again brought to the fore the fact that for 109 years Captain Stanley Lord, master of the Californian, has been a convenient scapegoat for the loss of life incurred by the sinking of the Titanic in 1912.

  • 12 July 2021
Letters to the editor

Everyone accepts the dangers of fatigue except the shipowners

Dr Dirk Max Johns' attempt to discredit the WMU report into fatigue issues is truly astonishing. It implies that ship owners don’t think they have a problem when it comes to fatigue amongst their crews. They do have a problem, and a very long standing one.

  • 14 June 2021

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